When the rubber hits the road

Rubber Hits Road


As the saying goes, the “rubber hits the road” at the point in time when a salesperson is in-front of a customer and moves to quickly communicate why they should buy. Salespeople need the right tools at their fingertips as they initiate relationships, build trust with customers and prospects, and when they close the sale.

Printed Materials Make Your Message Tangible

Your customers judge how sophisticated your company is based on the visual impact of your brochures and other sales materials – how they look, read and feel. Don’t be chinsey with the weight of the paper and the quality of the images in your brochure, because your customers will associate that quality with the quality of your company’s products and services.

Your Brochure’s Messaging

Crafting your messaging takes brain power. You need to spend some time developing a message that resonates with customers and is also relevant to their interests. Don’t rely on your brochure to show every item you sell. Instead, dig deep to understand exactly what it is that your customers are buying. Often your customers are buying something that you don’t even know you are selling. You might be pitching your products when it’s actually the company’s value they are buying. Ask yourself this question: Other than your product, what else does my company bring to the table that benefits the customer?

Remember, your brochure’s job is not to sell your products or services; that is your sales team’s job. A powerful brochure has messaging that speaks to solutions that solve your customer’s problem, and demonstates how your company is different than all of your competitors. What is your claim to fame?

A powerful brochure is memorable and will provide your customers with the information that is important to them.

How to create a powerful brochure:

The best way to understand how to create a powerful brochure is to look at a real-world example. This four-page capabilities brochure tells the story of HT Global Circuits.


1. The company’s focus is clearly declared, along with a bold claim that commands attention.

2. Notice you are not seeing a pile of circuit boards; instead, the main images are how you can use a pile of circuit boards.

3. A striking visual design captures the prospect’s attention.

4. Brief copy tells the firm’s story from a customer perspective, conveying empathy and understanding.

5. The background of this page subtly reinforces HT Global’s worldwide footprint.

6. This page focuses on HT Global’s capabilities and expertise. It’s a bit long but was necessary in this design. Bullet points with short sentences work better in most brochures.

7. This content also raises and overcomes several common customer objections.


  • Focus on the value your company delivers rather than just the products.
  • Show examples of your products in use or what the outcome is whenever possible.
  • Make it short, sweet and meaningful to the reader. Use bullet points and quality photos to tell your story.
  • Always have a call to action and direct people to your web site.

Marketing’s Secret Sauce: The Message

Secret Sauce VideoIf you’re looking for help in brand messaging, check out our 8-minute video presentation on  Marketing’s Secret Sauce. You’ll discover:


  • Why you must first focus on your brand message – not on the channels you’ll use to deliver it
  • Two key types of messages, and the critical role each one plays in your branding
  • Examples of companies that have powerfully positioned themselves in the minds of their customers using taglines and slogans
  • Three steps to develop a persuasive strategic brand message for your business

Try making your own eggnog this holiday…

Holiday Eggnog

Leave the pre-made eggnog on the grocery shelf… a top-notch, home-made eggnog is not much work.

Here’s how to make your own eggnog:

  1. Booze: Bourbon, brandy or rum are the typical choices. You don’t have to go expensive either beacuse the booze flavor is complimented by the flavor of the eggnog, so it all tastes great.
  2. Eggs: Pre-made eggnog (egg cream) may not have any eggs in it at all. Real eggnog contains eggs and the key is to buy them local and fresh if possible.
  3. Spices: The key spice in eggnog is nutmeg. Get it fresh ground from a spiece house or even consider grating it yourself. The store-bought stuff in a little can often has been sitting around for awhile and will not have the incredible aroma and taste of fresh nutmeg.
  4. Sugar: Don’t try and make eggnog a healthy drink by using a sugar substitute. Make your eggnog with real sugar but drink less of it to lower the calories. It will have a better taste based on how the sugar reacts with the other ingredients.

Here is the recipe, compliments of Derek Brown, a professional bartender in Baltimore that was adapted from a Gourmet Magazine article in 1945.

INGREDIENTS: (Serves 25 people, so cut down the ingredient amounts if you need or want less)

  • 2 dozen eggs
  • 1 (750 mL) bottle VS Cognac or other brandy
  • 16 oz. Jamaican rum
  • 2 lb powdered sugar
  • 3 qt. (96 oz.) whole milk
  • 1 qt. (32 oz.) heavy cream
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 3/4 tsp. grated nutmeg
  • glass punch bowl


Separate yolks from egg whites, set egg whites aside.

In a large bowl, beat the egg yolks until light and lemon-colored. While continuing to beat, add the brandy, rum, sugar, milk, heavy cream and salt. In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites and nutmeg until they form stiff peaks. Fold the whites into the yolk mixture. Serve in punch cups.

Eggnog will last for weeks in the refrigerator, so this can be made ahead of any special event. Make sure to store it in a glass container – bottle preferred.

Raise your cup in a toast to home made eggnog this year!


Give your customers a big ol’ “bro hug!”

The Bro Hug

When you see an old friend, do you give them a handshake or a ‘bro hug’? Of course, if you’re under 30 years old, you give them a hug to let them know that you’ve missed them and you appreciate them. It’s more intimate than a traditional handshake.

What’s a ‘bro hug’? It’s a visible sign of an ongoing relationship. You give one to a close friend or family member, someone who you know fairly well. It also carries with it the implication that, “I’m on your side. I’ve got your back. You can count on me!”

Have you ever considered giving your customers and prospects a bro hug to show them how much they’re appreciated? I’m not suggesting that you literally hug them, but to do so in the way you communicate with them.

Think about it… many companies still do the functional equivalent of standing on a chair and shouting at their customers and prospects. They make very little attempt to maintain ongoing relationships with them, but instead focus on transactions – closing the sale. In today’s world of empowered customers, that antiquated model of communication is simply too formal and non-personal.

So, what’s a successful way to communicate?

Consistent, ongoing, helpful communication that builds a relationship and establishes trust over time. Content that educates, informs and inspires is an awesome example. This customer-centric style of communication improves the odds that when a prospect is ready to buy, he or she will consider your company first.

To solidify a back and forth dialogue with their valued audience, successful marketers arrange events: open houses, webinars and training sessions, or they use surveys and focus groups.

How can you reach out with both arms and give your target audience a big ‘ol bro hug? Here are several ideas:

  • Ask your audience for feedback regarding their needs on a regular basis. Look for opportunities to have one-on-one conversations and build relationships with them at industry events. Get them involved in contests, crowdsourcing campaigns and surveys.
Here’s a great example of communicating with your audience that John Deere engineered:
At a trade show, the global equipment giant debuted the “Chatterbox,” a portable structure styled to resemble a piece of heavy equipment where customers could “talk back” and really give a piece of their mind to the company. This strategy was wildly successful, and was followed with an extensive marketing campaign that proclaimed, “We listened to you. Here’s what we did with what you told us.”
  • Make it easy for your audience to ask questions. One of our clients has a website with an extensive knowledge center that is highly valued by its customers worldwide. One key to its success: A search form centered at the top of their web page, inviting interaction. Other companies add a live chat feature to their website, enabling potential customers to talk to a human being and get answers to their questions. It’s all about initiating dialogue!
  • Use a conversational style of writing and communication. It’s okay to be a little bit informal and conversational because it makes your audience feel like they’re dealing with real people who care – not a faceless brand.
  • Provide a consistent, ongoing and helpful stream of communication to your audience, focusing on their needs, preferences and aspirations – not on your company’s new product and service enhancements.

If you need help creating this type of customer-centric communication, please contact us. We’d love to chat with you.

(See how that works, bro?)


Marketing’s Secret Sauce: The Message


It seems like anything successful has a secret formula, proprietary technology or “secret sauce” behind it that makes people talk about it. Marketing is no different.

The secret sauce of successful marketing is the message. It must command the attention of its target audience, get them to think and feel something – and ultimately like, trust and do business with your firm.

Check out this new 8-minute video, to discover:

  • Why you must first focus on your brand message – not on the channels you’ll use to deliver it
  • Two key types of messages, and the critical role each one plays in your branding
  • Examples of companies that have powerfully positioned themselves in the minds of their customers using taglines and slogans
  • Three steps to develop a persuasive strategic brand message for your business

They keep moving the marketing goalposts

Moving Goalposts

There’s an inherent mystery around the art and science of optimizing a web site for search. The optimization process changes nearly every week as Google works behind the scene, changing the rules to make their engine’s results more search friendly and relevance-centric. For SEO specialists, it’s like playing a soccer game where the goalposts keep moving every 15 minutes.

It’s rumored that some SEO gurus burn incense and go into a trance when they do their magic. Add to this that no one really sees the results of their optimization efforts for months as Google bots scan the entire content of the internet.

In the old days (4-5 years ago), you could load your web site text with searched keywords and Google would help people find you. Now, Google is going beyond the keywords and is “reading what you’ve written” to determine the meaning and relevancy of your content using more than just keywords.

This leads us to the 4 golden rules of SEO (which might change by the time you read this):

  1. Content drives SEO and content must be relevant. Making content relevant requires you to know WHO you are writing for and WHAT they want to know. You can’t just wing-it like you did with half your essays in high school. Google does semantic* searches now and they want content that has a take-away – a pay-off for the reader that addresses what he/she/they is searching for.Some research firms have discovered that Google likes comprehensive and thorough long form content more than short form. At the same time, content must be layered. Give readers a taste and lead them, using links, to more comprehensive and detailed content at the levels below. By the way, the essence of “comprehensive content” can mean adding videos, white papers, slide shows, etc., not more text. Bottom line, your content must be relevant and RESONATE with the target reader. The best content is meaningful and always meets the needs of the target reader.
  2. Back links are critical. Get back links to your site from AUTHORITATIVE domains. Getting other industry authorities to link to your mouth-watering, high value content can make a difference. It’s other websites with cred giving your website cred. Create great content and then promote it using social media.
  3. Think Mobile. Google indexes mobile-friendly sites first. If your site works well on smart phones and other mobile/pad devices, Google will give you extra brownie points. RESPONSIVE content that works well on any device is a must.
  4. Technical Factors
    • Encrypt your web site using HTTPS encryption. It prevents Google from labeling your site “unsafe” which can hurt your ranking.
    • H1 and H2 headings. These are in your site code and your technical specialist or SEO guru can help improve them.
    • Avoid pop ups and interstitials. Exceptions are log in dialogs, small banners which can be dismissed, and legally required interstitials. Most of these are annoying anyway

Much of the above advice may be too technical for some readers and that’s why enlisting a SEO specialist may be in order. But remember, you need to have a helicopter view of the SEO process in order fully understand what the specialists do.

Plus, much of the burden lies in the creation of content. So put whoever is creating content in the same room with the SEO specialists. They should be working shoulder-to-shoulder.

Want to dive deeper into SEO and how Content is a critical element? Download our eGuide: The Batman and Robin of Modern Marketing: Search Engine Optimization & Content

*Semantics: the branch of linguistics and logic concerned with meaning.

“Tilt” your way to grab your audience’s attention

Grab Audience's Attention

In the classic Spanish novel The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, a nobleman becomes so enamored with stories of brave knights and ladies fair that his perception of reality becomes warped. At one point, he attacks windmills, convinced that he must bravely vanquish these “ferocious giants.”

Don QuixoteAll too often, content marketers act like Don Quixote, mistaking content volume for content quality. We churn out copious volumes of “me-too” content, and then wonder why it gets ignored by most of the people we want to influence. We assume we know what our customers’ challenges, needs and aspirations are, but we miss them by a mile. Still, we charge forward like Don Quixote, convinced of the nobility of our quest.

Are you tilting at windmills with your content?

Let’s try an exercise. Open your company’s blog in a browser tab, and those of your competitors in other tabs. Now imagine the company logos and color schemes were scrubbed from each of these web pages. Would you be able to tell them apart?

In most industries, the answer is a resounding NO!

If your company is like most B2B firms, you’re producing blog posts, newsletters and other content that looks and reads remarkably like what your competitors are publishing. But if you can’t tell your content apart from that of your competitors, then neither can your target audience. That’s a big problem!

How to differentiate your content

If you’re frustrated by the state of your content marketing efforts, it may be time for you to “tilt” your perspective so that you are able to tell a unique story – one that cuts through the clutter and that is uniquely focused on the needs of your target audience. One way to do that is to ask smarter, more creative questions:

  • What assumptions are you making about your target audience that could be skewing your perceptions of their needs?
  • Imagine you have no prior knowledge of your target audience. How would you accurately learn about their needs? In other words, return to a state of “beginner’s mind,” free of any preconceived notions about them and their needs.
    What other perspectives should you consider?
  • How can you change the conversation in a way that’s so compelling that it will command the attention of your target audience?
    Most companies go very broad when defining their target audience; that usually means they have a lot of competition. Instead, think narrow: Is there a sub-niche within your main audience that you ought to learn more about and target with your content? Your goal is to become the recognized expert within that sub-niche.
  • Should you create a new product category? It should give you greater visibility than introducing another “me-too product” in an existing category. Bonus: In the short term, your brand will come to be identified with this new product category, which increases your odds of success.
  • Take the advice of Peter Thiel, the co-founder of PayPal: “Figure out something that nobody else is doing and look to create a monopoly in some area that’s been underdeveloped. Find a problem nobody else is solving.” That’s often where opportunity hides.
  • Which issues and topics are none of your competitors covering in your market niche? What is everyone missing? What do customers and your competitors take for granted? Can you take a stand on one of these issues? Just make sure you’ve got your customers’ best interests in mind when you do so.
  • What “jobs to be done” are your customers faced with? What’s inadequate about the existing solutions they’re using? Look for opportunities to educate them about a more effective alternative that will elegantly meet their needs.

Armed with the answers to these questions, you should be able to identify a compelling content tilt that you can use to deliver real value to your target audience and build productive relationships with them. Unlike Don Quixote, you will no longer be tilting at windmills. You’ll be winning the minds and hearts of real customers like never before.